Big Data U.S. Fixed Income: Who’s Your Daddy?

Big Data U.S. Fixed Income: Who’s Your Daddy?

I must say it is a daunting experience not only to be addressing this audience, but to be following such a distinguished list of panelists and speakers with such clear thinking about the future of Big Data.

My charge, as you may have read, is to discuss the use of big data in fixed income.

I am going to do that by trying to provide some perspective on how we got to where we are today. Because the path that brought us to this point. Right now. Is already defining our future.

I am going to do this as a market participant who believes that what is good for the debt markets, is good for society. We need to move past soundbites, and the idea of good guys vs bad guys so that we can really understand the drivers of the market’s momentum and make objective, better informed decisions about our individual roles.

I also believe that, collectively, we have the potential to not only influence the long-term stability of the largest that market in the world—almost $14 trillion in size—but also support its role as the risk-free interest rate for a multitude of global markets.

OpenDoor Invitation Works Wonders

OpenDoor Invitation Works Wonders

For Michael Paulus, the chance to join the management team of OpenDoor Securities was an opportunity to put his decades of banking and public sector experience to use in an exciting new, but related way. hide

As a key member of the leadership, Michael has been working closely with CEO, Susan Estes, a trading icon, on a financial technology solution that seeks to address many of the issues facing the U.S. government debt market. It’s a tall order but the signs are already good

The Evolving Structure of the U.S. Treasury Market and its Impact on Incumbent Dealers

The Evolving Structure of the U.S. Treasury Market and its Impact on Incumbent Dealers

A lot is going to change in the next few years for the US Treasury market. Not all of this will be good for the stability and health of the primary funding source for the U.S. government. But the evolving role of primary dealers means that, for many, acting as riskless principals could allow them to increase profitability, while deploying less capital at the same time.

Context is Everything

Context is Everything

The volatility that the bond markets experienced on October 14, 2014 was unlike any other, not due to the extent of the price swings but because of the impact on the market.  After all, as a reader pointed out in response to my previous share, the volatility and price moves in the 1970’s and early 1980’s were likely larger and more frequent.  But as the American psychologist, Noam Shpancer said, “context determines the meaning of things.”

Treasury Buybacks: Not So Fast

Treasury Buybacks: Not So Fast

The idea of a U.S. Treasury buyback program has major drawbacks for the U.S. Treasury, end-investors, and even the Federal Reserve. Indeed, buying back off-the-run Treasuries (OFTRs) to create jumbo on-the-run (OTR) benchmarks will inadvertently lead to further deterioration in the OFTRs, the sector of the market that accounts for 98% of all Treasury issuance.

The root of the issue with Treasury buybacks lies in the bifurcation of the market, with trading of OTRs dominated by principal trading firms (PTFs).  Helping this constituency by bolstering the size of benchmark issues does not add to the stability of the overall market.  In contrast, genuine long-term holders of the government’s debt are concentrated in the OFTRs. While these real money investors may use OTRs to adjust duration (or when they need immediate access to liquidity), portfolio re-balancing is often done in cheaper OFTRs.  

Treasury Market Liquidity: The Forgotten 98%

Treasury Market Liquidity: The Forgotten 98%

The Fed and the Treasury describe the U.S. Treasury market as, “the deepest and most liquid government securities market in the world.” While arguably true for the six on-the-run (OTR) benchmark securities, those six securities make up less than 2% of the total $13.4 trillion of total outstanding supply. It is the other 98%, known as off-the-runs (OFTRs) that should be of greater concern to market participants and policy-makers alike.

Investment Managers Need Access to Better Pricing in Treasury Market

Investment Managers Need Access to Better Pricing in Treasury Market

Lack of liquidity in a key sector of the government bond market is now costing institutional investors billions of dollars annually in sharply widening bid/offer spreads. This post-financial crisis inefficiency is straining market structure to the point that the traditional principal-based dealer model is not working for either the dealers or the buy-side community. It’s time for a new way of doing business.

The principal area of concern is the off-the-run sector of the U.S. Treasury market, which accounts for more than 35% of all trading activity, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. This sector includes all but a half-dozen of the approximately 296 total outstanding U.S. Treasury issues. The six securities are the most recently issued, or “on-the-run” securities, and are almost 100% traded electronically in a highly transparent market. But off-the-run securities are still largely traded by phone, and that’s where the trouble lurks.